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alpfa lubricatorThis cylinder lubrication, shown in the figure is based on a lubricator which injects a specific volume of oil into each cylinder for each (or for every second, third, etc.) revolution. The oil fed to the injectors is pressurized by means of Alpha lubricator on each cylinder, equipped with small multi-piston pumps. The amount of oil fed to the injectors can be finely tuned with an adjusting screw, which limits the length of the piston stroke. The cylinder lube oil consumption in ME type engines, with electronic lubricators, has come down to 0.7 gm / BHP hr.

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imagesIP (or "Ingress Protection") ratings are defined in international standard EN 60529 (British BS EN 60529:1992, European IEC 60509:1989). They are used to define levels of sealing effectiveness of electrical enclosures against intrusion from foreign bodies (tools, dirt etc) and moisture.

What do the numbers in an IP Rating mean?

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Solid-bulk-cargoes-which-may-liquefy

UK MCA has issued Marine Guidanced Note regarding the guidelines for developing and approving procedures for sampling, testing and controlling the moisture content for solid bulk cargoes which may liquefy.

Liquefaction of fine particle cargoes, resulting in cargo movement and loss of stability hasbeen associated with the loss of life in numerous,...

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Insulation-flangesSIGGTO has issued a document to provide an explanation of how insulation flanges provide protection against ignition caused by arcing. Insulation flanges have been in wide use for more than three decades and, while there have been no reported incidents of fires at tanker or gas carrier manifolds that may have been caused by arcing when connecting o...

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ballast_1There are two main types of ballast water exchange: sequential and flow through.1 Sequential ballast water exchange involves completely emptying segregated ballast tanks (individually or in sequence) and then refilling them with open ocean water.
This method is considered the most effective ballast water exchange method, since it involves completely emptying the ballast water tank of NIS-laden water and refilling it with clean open-ocean water. Ship stability, strength, drafts, and trim experience significant changes during sequential exchange, making this option unfeasible for some ships, particularly in heavy weather.

Attachments:
Download this file (Sequential Method ballasting deballasting.pdf)Sequential Method ballasting deballasting.pdf[Ballast Water Exchange Sequential Method]257 kB
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polishingHull roughness, surface roughness & Propeller roughness – some definitions. As “roughness” is not just roughness, definitions of some relevant types of roughness might come in handy.
 
The instrument to measuring hull roughness is The BSRA Roughness Gauge. The instrument measures the Average Hull Roughness (AHR), which is defined as the average of minimum 100 measurements of Mean Hull Roughness (MHR). MHR is the average of highest peak to lowest trough in 50 mm measuring length. MHR is comparable to “Average Rmax” or Rtm.

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ballast_1There are two main types of ballast water exchange: sequential and flow-through. Flow-through ballast water exchange involves pumping open ocean water into a full ballast tank for a length of time sufficient to flush the ballast water tank. Tanks are typically flushed with a quantity of water equivalent to three times the tank volume. Assuming perfect mixing, a three-tank volume flush will theoretically achieve 95% replacement of the original ballast water volume.

Attachments:
Download this file (Flow-Through Method.pdf)Flow-Through Method.pdf[Ballast Water Exchange Flow-Through Method]256 kB
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